Standards for sunglasses

There are three main sunglass standards, popularly known as a reference mostly for sunglass protection from the UV radiation: The European standard EN 1836:2005, The Australian Standard AS/NZS 1067:2003 and The U.S. standard ANSI Z80.3-2001; these standards do, however, include further requirements as well. A ISO standard worldwide does not exist of yet.

The Australian Standard AS/NZS 1067:2003

The Australian Standard for Sunglasses and Fashion Spectacles (AS/NZS 1067:2003) is perhaps the toughest and mandatory sunglass standard in the world. It has recently been updated and reviewed and includes new stricter labeling requirements for fashion and sunglasses spectacles.

Classification

Fashion Spectacles and Sunglasses are classified by the amount of light passing through these lens. This is termed the luminous transmittance. Lenses with 22% transmittance allow 22% of light rays to pass through them to your eye. The new labeling requirements for these are based on the transmittance value.

Lens Category 0 (Zero) - 100% - 80% transmittance
Not Sunglasses - Fashion Spectacles
Very low reduction of sun glare and some UV protection

Lens Category 1 (One) - 80%- 43% transmittance
Not Sunglasses - Fashion Spectacles
Limited Sun glare reduction and some UV protection
NOT SUITABLE WHEN DRIVING AT NIGHT

Lens Category 2 (Two) - 43% - 18% transmittance
Not Fashion Spectacle - Sunglasses
Medium reduction of sun glare and good UV protection
NOT SUITABLE WHEN DRIVING AT NIGHT

Lens Category 3 (Three) - 18%- 8% transmittance
Not Fashion Spectacle - Sunglasses
High reduction of sun glare and good UV protection
NOT SUITABLE WHEN DRIVING AT NIGHT

Lens Category 4 (Four) - 8% - 3% transmittance
Special Purpose Sunglasses
Very high reduction of sun glare and good UV protection
MUST NOT BE WORN WHEN DRIVING

Ultraviolet Protection
UVC – Nearly all of these harmful rays get blocked out by Earth’s atmosphere. UVB - The AU Standard allows UVB transmittance to reach 5% of all luminous transmission for the given lens. For instance, if their luminous transmittance reaches 20%, the allowed UVB one is 1%. To summarize, 99% of all harmful UVB rays should be blocked.
UVA - This Standard has requirements similar for UVA transmittance and UVB transmittance. For the Lens Categories 2, 1 and 0, UVA transmittance has to be no more than normal luminous transmittance. For the Lens Categories 4 and 3, the UVA transmittance is fifty percent of all luminous transmittance.

Sunglass Size

The minimal vertical diameter for the adult sunglasses is twenty-eight millimeters and the minimal for children is twenty-four millimeters . Small framed sunglasses which are sometimes fashionable overseas are punishable in Australia. As they let more light or UV rays it, these sunglasses are regarded unsafe in Australia.

The European standard EN 1836:2005

The European standard classifies sunglasses in four groups according to their capability for blocking UV rays:
"0" (Zero) for not sufficient UV protection,
"2"(Two) for UHV sufficient protection,
"6"(Six) for usable UHV protection
"7"(Seven) for complete UHVV protection, which means that only 5 % of all 380 nm rays get transmitted.

Products that fulfill this standard receive the CE mark. There is not a rating for protection against radiation transmittance up to 400 nm or UV400, as is required in other places including the United States and recommended by the experts. As well as filtering, this standard lists requirements for the minimum robustness as well as, labeling, the materials - non-toxic to your skin and not combustible and lack of sharp edges (to avoid harm due to wearing them).

The U.S. standard ANSI Z80.3-2001

The U.S. sunglass standard is ANSI Z80.3-2001, including three transmittance classes. According to the ANSI Z80.3-2001, the lenses should have UVB (315 to 280 nm) transmittance of less than a per cent and UVA (380 to 315 nm) transmittance of less than 0.3 times visual light transmittance. This ANSI Z87.1-2003 standard features requirements for high impact and basic impact protection. During the test for basic impact, a 1 inch steel ball is dropped onto the lens from the height of 50 inches. In the test for high velocity, a 1/4 inch steel ball gets shot at 150 ft/s at the lens. To pass both of the tests, no lens part can touch the eye.